Uncategorized

31 for 21: Having a sister can be a real pain

Re-blogging an old post on having a sister with DS. I’m also linking a brief article by Brian Skotko and Sue Levine on siblings as advocates. I welcome questions about what it’s like to have 3 siblings with DS.

PS For the time being I am April’s Facebook friend. I expect this to last, at most, another 6-9 months.

Talk - Down Syndrome

I’d always wanted a sister, so when April arrived on the scene I was ecstatic. In fact, I actually named her – April Joy – because I was so happy. I visited her in the hospital after she was born and was told she had Down syndrome. And guess what? I think it’s made me love her more (if that’s possible).

Do we get along all the time? NO! She’s my sister. I don’t know everything going on in her life because I am “Miss Pain In the Butt” or referred to as “Your annoying daughter” when I call for my mom. Why? Maybe because I give unsolicited dating advice although I haven’t been on the dating scene in 10+ years. Or I bug her to eat less and work out more. Or I tell her to stop posting so many things about Twilight on her darn Facebook page. And I’m nosey. I’m very…

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Part 1 of Standardized Testing and Down syndrome: Growth and Comparison

Many parents...take issue with why clinicians test children with Down syndrome using standardized measures.

Ages and Stages, Family, Uncategorized

Advice for moms (or anyone) WITHOUT a child with Down syndrome

Calling all parents of a child(ren) with Down syndrome. I am submitting an article for a local Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) Chapter on how moms can support their friend(s) who have a child with Down syndrome or other special needs. But, I can't write this one on my own. I really need your feedback and insights! … Continue reading Advice for moms (or anyone) WITHOUT a child with Down syndrome

Therapy Tools, Uncategorized

“Calling all adorable children with Down syndrome!”

Toys-R-Us publishes a catalogue each year highlighting developmental toys. Now your cutie (between 12 months and 10 years) can be in the newest edition. See the link below for more info. Special shout-out to Dr. Brian Skotko for posting the application on Facebook this morning. Thanks Brian! Toys R Us Model Application

Birth to Three, Family, Speech & Language, Therapy Activities, Uncategorized

31 for 21: Move to the music

Ever wonder why children's songs and finger-plays have motions to them? Well early in life children (including those with Down syndrome) learn to coordinate big movements (gross motor) before small movements (fine motor). Songs that have gestures help children learn the words (speech) and are a great learning tool (memory). Music and movement are very… Continue reading 31 for 21: Move to the music